Global Gallery
35% Off Everything!
SALE ENDS THURSDAY AT MIDNIGHT CST!
HOME > ARTISTS > C >

MARY CASSATT

>

A GOODNIGHT HUG


Loading
  • Giclée on Paper
  • Giclée on Canvas
Product Image
Normal View
View to Scale
View in Room
View Details
Zoom Image
  • Details
  • Add a Frame
  • Select Frame
  • Select Matting
  • Canvas Options


by 

Price:  
Frame it Add to Cart
Type:

| Details
Item No:
How Many Mats? 1 mat 2 mats no mat
  • Top Mat
  • Bottom Mat
  • Mat Width
 
Top - Left - Right
Bottom
Design Tip: The width of the mat can make a very dramatic change to the design and style of framed artwork.
Top Mat:
Bottom Mat:
  • Linen Liner
  • Stretch Options
  • Brush Strokes
  • Help?
Stretcher Bar Depth
DEEP
REGULAR
Stretch Type
MUSEUM
Side Color
Linen Liner
YES
NO

Linen liners are a sophisticated and premium addition to a framed canvas. Our liners are wood mouldings wrapped in pure white cotton linen and provide a transition from the image to the frame. Liner Details
Linen Liner Linen Liner
Brush strokes
YES
NO

This enhancement to our canvas product is hand applied by artisans to create a visual and textural depth to the canvas by replicating the brush strokes that would be found in the original work.
Canvas Stretch Explained
Gallery Wrap:

This premium option adds a contemporary effect by mirroring the outer border of the image onto the sides of the wrapped canvas.

Museum Wrap:

Canvas is wrapped with your option of side color. All canvas items are perfectly suitable to be hung without a frame.

Bar Depth:

Stretcher bars are used to build the wooden inner-frame that the canvas is stretched around. The depth is the distance from the back of the canvas to the face of the canvas.

Bar Depth: Deep - 1 1/2 in
Stretch Type:
Side Color: Image
Linen Liner: Yes
Brushstrokes:
Be Social:
Related Items

About our Products

Quality: We love art (a lot) and are proud to offer the highest quality fine art reproductions available anywhere. That’s right – anywhere. From the inks and papers we use all the way to the care we take in packaging every order for shipment, our obsession with quality has no end.
Selection: With many exclusive collections, our product offering of fine art prints, digital posters, and canvas art reproductions is as extensive and diverse as you will find anywhere. That’s right – anywhere. Our curated line contains imagery for all of your decor and design needs.
Customization: You have found the perfect art. Now what? Using our innovative custom framing tool you can preview exactly what your finished and framed art will look like. There is no better way to tell your art that you love it (a lot) than by wrapping it up in a custom frame.
Biography
Mary Cassatt

Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) lived in Europe for five years as a young girl. She was tutored privately in art in Philadelphia and attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1861-65, but she preferred learning on her own and in 1866 traveled to Europe to study. Her first major showing was at the Paris Salon of 1872; four more annual Salon exhibitions followed.

In 1874 Cassatt chose Paris as her permanent residence and established her studio there. She shared with the Impressionists an interest in experiment and in using bright colours inspired by the out-of-doors. Edgar Degas became her friend; his style and that of Gustave Courbet inspired her own. Degas was known to admire her drawing especially, and at his request she exhibited with the Impressionists in 1879 and joined them in shows in 1880, 1881, and 1886. Like Degas, Cassatt showed great mastery of drawing, and both artists preferred unposed asymmetrical compositions. Cassatt also was innovative and inventive in exploiting the medium of pastels.

Initially, Cassatt was a figure painter whose subjects were groups of women drinking tea or on outings with friends. After the great exhibition of Japanese prints held in Paris in 1890, she brought out her series of 10 coloured prints--e.g., Woman Bathing and The Coiffure--in which the influence of the Japanese masters Utamaro and Toyokuni is apparent. In these etchings, combining aquatint, dry point, and soft ground, she brought her printmaking technique to perfection. Her emphasis shifted from form to line and pattern. Soon after 1900 her eyesight began to fail, and by 1914 she had ceased working. The principal motif of her mature and perhaps most familiar period is mothers caring for small children, e.g., The Bath (La Toilette, c. 1892; Art Institute of Chicago).

Cassatt urged her wealthy American friends and relatives to buy Impressionist paintings, and in this way, more than through her own works, she exerted a lasting influence on American taste. She was largely responsible for selecting the works that make up the H.O. Havemeyer Collection in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City.